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Volvo semi tractors ordered off the road

The next time you are out on the highways of Louisiana, take a look around you. How many of the big rig trucks in your vicinity are powered by a Volvo tractor? You might be surprised.

As designs go, Volvo semi tractors tend to have a sleeker look than, say, Mack or Peterbilt models. But anyone who has ever been in an accident involving an 18-wheeler likely will attest that no matter the looks, these monsters of the road do significant damage. Victims who live may endure catastrophic injury. Those who die leave behind grieving loved ones. Seeking compensation for pain, loss and suffering is the right of these victims.

Sometimes negligence on the part of the truck driver can be pinpointed as a major factor in a crash and he or she deserves to be held accountable. But what if deeper issues play a role -- like the failure of some defective part on the truck? Tractor manufacturers have a responsibility to be sure that their vehicles are built right and up to the task for which they are used. If they fail in that regard and an accident results, they too deserve to be held accountable.

This may be something of a concern for some newer model Volvo semi tractors. According to news reports, The U.S. Department of Transportation has ordered thousands off the road. Those affected include models from three lines built between May 2015 and March 2016. The problem is that they reportedly came off the assembly line lacking a single pin in the steering shaft. As a result, officials say the shaft can separate without warning, causing the driver to lose control of the truck.

Some 20,000 trucks are covered by the action. State and federal inspectors are under orders to keep eyes peeled for these trucks and to ban them from operating unless it can be shown that they've been fixed already.

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