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Car wreck may result from driving while distracted

A program in Louisiana known as Choices seeks to share the message with students that all choices come with price tags. For instance, a car wreck may be the consequence of driving while texting or engaging in other distracted driving activities behind the wheel. As part of the Choices program, speakers share their stories about the losses they have experienced as a result of distracted driving.

Another program, called It Can Wait, is a national campaign sponsored by AT&T. This particular program has been around for six years and emphasizes the pain that driving while distracted can cause, all in an effort to change the negligent behaviors of drivers. One video used in the program depicts a mom viewing a Facebook photo prior to a serious crash.

AT&T also has a distracted driving simulator that demonstrates how things can quickly go wrong when a driver tries to look at a phone while operating a vehicle. Some 40 percent of the participants acknowledged that the texted and drove before using the simulator. After using it, more than 80 percent said they planned to never do it again.

If a person is injured in a car wreck due to someone else's decision to drive while distracted, the injured party has the right to file a personal injury claim against the allegedly at-fault person, seeking damages. Likewise, the surviving loved ones of a person who has died as a result of distracted driving may opt to file a wrongful death lawsuit. Competent proof of negligence is necessary to establish liability to the satisfaction of a civil court in Louisiana. Once that is accomplished, financial damage claims will be considered.

Source: news8000.com, "Role-playing distracted driving to stop it", Kelly Wallace, Aug. 5, 2016

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